/institutional/perspectives/sector-views/narmbs-building-blocks-for-recovery

Non-Agency Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities: Building Blocks for Recovery

Elevated economic risks and credit stress are fully priced and should set the stage for future performance.

March 11, 2021


This Non-Agency Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities sector report is excerpted from the First Quarter 2021 Fixed-Income Outlook.

Non-Agency RMBS prices increased over the fourth quarter as broader risk markets continued to recover from their pandemic-induced dislocations. RMBS 1.0 and 2.0 returned 1.8 percent and 1.0 percent in the fourth quarter, respectively, putting returns in positive territory for all RMBS subsectors for 2020. Highly rated RMBS 2.0 bonds have fully retraced their second-quarter selloff, while lower-rated RMBS 1.0 and mezzanine classes have retraced approximately 80 percent of their early 2020 slide.

High unemployment strained homeowners’ finances and resulted in elevated mortgage delinquencies, which are now on a slow path to recovery.

Mortgage Delinquencies Are Slowly Declining

High unemployment strained homeowners’ finances and resulted in elevated delinquencies, which are now on a slow path to recovery.

Mortgage Delinquencies Are Slowly Declining

Source: Guggenheim Investments, J.P. Morgan. Data as of 12.31.2020.

Structural changes in loan servicing after the 2008 financial crisis, which strongly favor workouts over foreclosures, and the absence of weakly documented or highly leveraged “affordability mortgages,” have kept collateral losses far below those experienced in 2008–2009 and prevented credit deterioration from transmitting adverse feedback to the housing market.

Looking forward, pre-financial crisis originated RMBS 1.0 is emerging as a rare institutional-scale, investable market that has experienced two credit cycles in its history. These cycles have the effect of creating “credit burnout,” or positive credit selection, where cycles of stress have forced liquidation or modification of weaker loans, thereby leaving a collateral pool of surviving borrowers who are less sensitive to future economic shocks. RMBS 1.0 loans outstanding today have survived the 10 percent unemployment and 30+ percent home price decline of the financial crisis, as well as the 16 percent peak unemployment experienced in the second quarter of 2020. In addition, loan principal amortization and home price gains have reduced RMBS 1.0 loan-to-value ratios to approximately 55 percent, suggesting significant homeowner equity and incentive to perform.

RMBS 1.0 Mortgage Loan LTV Declined to 55 Percent

RMBS 1.0 Mortgage Loan-to-Value Ratios Declined to 55 Percent

Loan principal amortization and home price gains have reduced RMBS 1.0 loan-to-value ratios to approximately 55 percent, suggesting significant homeowner equity and incentive to perform.

RMBS 1.0 Mortgage Loan-to-Value Ratios Declined to 55 Percent

Source: Guggenheim Investments, Intex. Data as of 12.28.2020. Chart shows ratio of amortized outstanding mortgage loan balance to estimated updated home price for 2005–2007 vintage and subprime loans.

The combination of a stable housing market, low interest rates, and multi-cycle credit burnout underpin our preference for senior tranches of credit-sensitive RMBS 1.0 deals. For longer investment horizons, RMBS 1.0 has the potential for price appreciation from improving credit performance and bond cash flows. RMBS 2.0 tranches at the senior level offer credit stability and a modest yield pickup to the risk-free benchmarks, while subordinated tranches offer incrementally higher yields supported by the tailwinds of improving credit fundamentals.

—Karthik Narayanan, CFA, Managing Director; Roy Park, Director

Important Notices and Disclosures

This article is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be considered as investing advice or a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. It contains opinions of the authors but not necessarily those of Guggenheim Partners or its subsidiaries. The authors’ opinions are subject to change without notice. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but are not assured as to accuracy. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Investing involves risk. In general, the value of fixed-income securities fall when interest rates rise. High-yield securities present more liquidity and credit risk than investment grade bonds and may be subject to greater volatility. Asset-backed securities, including mortgage-backed securities, may have structures that make their reaction to interest rates and other factors difficult to predict, making their prices volatile and they are subject to liquidity risk. Investments in floating rate senior secured syndicated bank loans and other floating rate securities involve special types of risks, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and prepayment risk. Guggenheim Investments represents the following affiliated investment management businesses of Guggenheim Partners, LLC: Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, Security Investors, LLC, Guggenheim Funds Investment Advisors, LLC, Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, Guggenheim Real Estate, LLC, GS GAMMA Advisors, LLC, Guggenheim Partners Europe Limited, and Guggenheim Partners India Management. ©2021, Guggenheim Partners, LLC. No part of this article may be reproduced in any form, or referred to in any other publication, without express written permission of Guggenheim Partners, LLC.


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Guggenheim Investments represents the following affiliated investment management businesses of Guggenheim Partners, LLC: Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC, Security Investors, LLC, Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC, Guggenheim Funds Investment Advisors, LLC, Guggenheim Corporate Funding, LLC, Guggenheim Partners Europe Limited, Guggenheim Partners Fund Management (Europe) Limited, Guggenheim Partners Japan Limited, GS GAMMA Advisors, LLC, and Guggenheim Partners India Management.